Insects are disappearing around the World

Insects are disappearing around the World

Today I woke up early and clicked on YouTube. Always a great information source to find out what’s going on around the world. Well to my horror I discovered that insects are disappearing around the globe. Almost in every country the numbers have been devastated over the last decade. So what is the cause? Farming practice! There are just too many farms using too many pesticides. Also the large tractors take every last seed when they sow the land leaving nothing behind for are fellow bugs.

So what would the world be like without insects. Well to be honest there would probably not be a world because every creature on earth is life depended on our fellow bugs. Birds are just one example that need insects for food. Can you imagine a world with no plants. Plants need insects to survive. Without insects there would be nobody left to pollinate except birds. If there are no insects there are no birds. No insects and no birds mean no plants. No Plants means no food for humans grown in the wild. This is all quite alarming and could be happening right now as I am writing this article.

Insects are disappearing around the World

Insects are disappearing around the World

There are 1.4 billion insects for each one of us. These insects all play a rolde. Feeding us to cleaning up waste to generating $57 billion for the U.S. economy alone. Yes I quess you didn’t know that! Bugs are making money for us. They are the invisible force working throughout the world to keep nature inline. Almonds in California or watermelons in Florida wouldn’t be available if it were not for bees. Insects also return nutrients to the earth. If they weren’t around, the amount of decay and rot all over the place would be terrible.

Mace Vaughan and John Losey, two entomologists, did in-depth research on how much insects contribute economically to the U.S. What they found was, it’s about $57 billion, not including pollination. Most of this comes from wildlife, which insects keep going along because they are the base of the food chain for fish, birds, or mammals. Pest controlling insects add a further half billion. And there is no way to account for how much it costs to recycle a dead body or decompose plant life.

Insects as Food for Humans

Insects are disappearing around the World

Now not only are bugs strange looking they are also eaten by people around the world. From Fried to steamed insects are considered a tasty food in many countries around the world. 2,086 species of insect are eaten by 3,071 different ethnic groups in about 130 countries. Could you even imagine if insects disappeared? What would these people eat to replace them. Insects are full of vitamins and minerals and where food is scare both humans and animals depend on them to survive.

If humans went extinct tomorrow nothing too much would happen to the planet, but insect extinction could be cataclysmic. Explain why.

Life on earth would go on without humans but would it survive without Bugs? Bug extinction could be the most extensive extinction on the planet. It’s scary because you don’t notice it until it’s too late. Insects are disappearing around the world and you should be concerned because without them your very existence could be at risk. And they are disappearing at a very alarming rate.

Insects are disappearing around the World

Bug extinction is one of the most extensive extinctions on the planet. It’s scary because you don’t notice it until it’s too late. Migration patterns are shifting due to climate, and insects offer a great way of looking at that. A collector went to the Antioch Dunes in California, in the 1960s, and caught a range of bugs. When scientists returned decades later, they found many species were gone, and the host plants with them. These creatures rely on plants and certain weather patterns and temperatures, an adaptive power they’ve gained over the past 400 million years.

Twenty years ago you could have seen one billion monarch butterflies migrate to Mexico. The latest count is 56.5 million. To combat the decline, the Obama Administration, working with Fish & Wildlife, enacted this migration highway running from Texas to Minnesota. They planted milkweed along the way, which is the host plant for monarch butterflies, hoping to quadruple that 56.5 million by 2020. I am an optimistic cynic, so I feel that insects will outlive us, if we haven’t totally screwed the planet.

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