Scientists discover remains of 150- million-year-old sea monster in Antarctica

This Enormous Ice Shelf Has Broken Up – And It’s Revealed A Mysterious Primeval Ecosystem

 

What is going on in Antartica. Scientists discover remains of 150-million-year-old sea monster in Antarctica. A vast sheet of ice breaks off from a peninsula and drifts out into the sea. But as the gap between them widens, a new world is slowly revealed – one that might not have seen daylight in 120,000 years.

 

Antarctica stretches over almost 5.5 million square miles. But for all of its size, the world’s coldest and most inhospitable continent has no indigenous inhabitants, and its vast landscapes are completely devoid of cities and towns.Covering an area equivalent to that of Mexico and the United States combined,

 

And because of this isolation, Antarctica remains the last true wilderness on planet Earth. Here, seals, penguins and whales far outnumber the handful of human inhabitants who make the long trek in order to study the continent’s many secrets. Every year, more and more of that ice is melting, revealing things that have been hidden for hundreds of thousands of years.

Temperatures in Antarctica have been known to drop as low as -128° F. That is one cool cucumber. No wonder nobody lives down there. And that my friends is one of the Worlds biggest mystery’s. Why doesn’t anyone live in Antarctica. Lot’s of people live in the North Pole don’t they. Why not the South Pole. This is truly a mystery that needs more attention.

150 million-year-old plesiosaur in Antarctica—and it bears a striking resemblance to the legendary Scottish monster of Loch Ness. The creature is the first of its species located in Antarctica and the oldest creature ever found on the continent.

Plesiosaur Painter Heinrich Harder depicted plesiosaurs in 1916. Public Domain

Scientists found the creature’s bones at the tip of Antarctica, a two-hour helicopter ride from Argentina’s Marambio Base

“The discovery is pretty extraordinary, because the rock types at the site weren’t thought conducive to the preservation of bones, like the vertebrae of this marine reptile,”

“At this site, you can find a great diversity of fish, ammonites, some bivalves, but we did not expect to find such an ancient plesiosaur,” said paleontologist Soledad Cavalli, who is based at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council in Argentina.

he added.

Enormous Ancient Carnivores

With a huge body, four powerful flippers and a long, winding neck, plesiosaurs look an awful lot like the fabled Loch Ness Monster, rumored to live in a lake in Scotland. Unfortunately for fans of the mythical creature, scientists believe Nessie, as she is affectionately known, is almost certainly fictional. The bones of ancient plesiosaurs, however, have been discovered around the world.

As the ice sheets of Antarctica slowly melt and break away from the continent more and more secrets are about to be revealed of the mysterious creatures that use to abound there millions and millions of years ago and who know may still be alive today protected by the huge ceiling of ice that has kept them safe for millions of years.

Scientists discover
remains of 150-
million-year-old
sea monster in Antarctica

More about the discovery:

  • The four-finned reptile, which measured up to 12 meters (13 yards) long, dates from the late Jurassic period and is the most ancient creature ever discovered on the continent
  • With a huge body, four powerful flippers and a long, winding neck, plesiosaurs look a lot like the fabled Loch Ness Monster, rumored to live in a lake in Scotland
  • The first scientifically documented discovery of a plesiosaur skeleton was published in 1719 by English antiquarian William Stukeley
Representational Image
  • The plesiosaur family was diverse, including a number of distinct species. The largest stretched up to 39 feet long
  • The discovery suggests that the ancient frozen lake where the new fossil was unearthed might prove to be a site of vast paleontological wealth
  • The oldest plesiosaur species comes from the youngest part of the Triassic period and is about 201 million years old.
 edited by
Brent Arnold Walker
Zoomers News
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Brent Arnold Walker is the Editor of Zoomers News...Location South Vancouver BC Canada...Raised in the heart of War Vet Housing ...A True Baby Boomer

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